2020 All New Kia Sorento Review

4/5

Overview

The words ‘Premium’ and ‘Kia’ used to be rarely used in the same sentence but that is not the case anymore. The new Kia Sorento bucks the trend in other areas too. First of all, it is bigger than the previous generation. Although it has the same underpinnings as the old Sorrento, the wheelbase has been lengthened by 80mm, increasing the overall length by 95mm to 4,780mm. It is also more squat and sits lower to the ground, giving the car great road presence. The increased length has allowed for more space inside and there is now more head and leg room than the previous generation. Since the second row of seats nestle neatly into the floor when folded, there is now a massive 1,732 litres of space in the boot, decreasing to 605 litres with the seats up. 

Pros
  • Extensive list of standard equipment
  • Upmarket interior
  • Typical Kia reliability record
  • Grippy handling
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • Top trim levels can be expensive

Exterior

Peter Schreyer’s latest, more striking design, gives the car added road presence. The Sorento is 10mm longer than the previous model and has a more pointed appearance. The chrome trim that follows along the slim LED headlights give it a tough, aggressive posture. It is the same story from behind as the rear lights have been exchanged for the vertical ones influenced by the Kia Telluride SUV on the US market.

Interior

Overall the interior is a definite improvement. The design of the wraparound dash and centre console is far more ergonomically and visually pleasing than the Sorento’s of old. Irish buyers get four spec levels, ascending from KX-1 to KX-4 and can expect the Sorrento to be equipped with nice extras such as power-adjustable driver and passenger seats and ventilated front seats. 

Performance

So far there is only one engine to choose from, a 2.2 litre turbodiesel that is refined at low speeds but able to deliver a punch when required. Kia have done a lot of work on the independent suspension and it shows as the ride is surprisingly supple. 0 – 100 kilometres per hour can be done in 9 seconds with a manual gearbox while the automatic will do it in 9.6. 

Reliability

Kia’s legendary 7 year warranty still rules them all, as does the Korean giants excellent reliability record. 

Running Costs

Kia’s pricing range is no longer bargain basement, but then neither are their cars. The Sorento is extremely well equipped (particularly with safety tech) with adaptive cruise control, lane departure warnings, blind spot detectors, traffic sign recognition, a massive one-piece panoramic sunroof, 360-degree cameras and self-parking just a few of the niceties. The 2.2 litre turbodiesel engine returns a claimed fuel economy figure of 49.6mpg.

Handling

The longer wheelbase has other benefits besides giving the Sorento extra space. It has allowed the engineers to make modifications to the MacPherson struts at the front and multi-link system at the back to accommodate larger bushings and shock absorbers to allow for a smoother ride. The new chassis is also improved, finally allowing the car to take corners with ease.

Safety

The 2020 Kia Sorento was awarded a five-star NCAP safety rating and it’s not hard to see why with an extensive list of all the latest safety equipment and features as standard including six airbags. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
10%

The words ‘Premium’ and ‘Kia’ used to be rarely used in the same sentence but that is not the case anymore. The new Kia Sorento bucks the trend in other areas too. First of all, it is bigger than the previous generation. Although it has the same underpinnings as the old Sorrento, the wheelbase has been lengthened by 80mm, increasing the overall length by 95mm to 4,780mm. It is also more squat and sits lower to the ground, giving the car great road presence. The increased length has allowed for more space inside and there is now more head and leg room than the previous generation. Since the second row of seats nestle neatly into the floor when folded, there is now a massive 1,732 litres of space in the boot, decreasing to 605 litres with the seats up.