2021 Citroen C4 Review

5/5

Overview

Citroën has a proud past as a manufacturer of cars that fall into the French tradition of being charming and comfortable. From the unforgettable DS of the 1960’s to the C4 Cactus of the 21st century, the French car giant has often left us guessing as to their next move. Judging by what we have seen so far, the latest edition of the Citroën C4 promises to continue this trend as it replaces the quirky Cactus. While it will lean towards a crossover SUV, it takes many of its styling cues from the C5 Aircross. Citroën has informed us that the main emphasis of the C4 will be on comfort and each model will come equipped with Advanced Comfort seats - including optional heating and massaging systems - and Progressive Hydraulic Cushion suspension, which utilises two hydraulic stops to smooth out bumps in the road.

Pros
  • Extensive list of standard equipment
  • Futuristic exterior design
  • Typical Citroen comfort and refinement
  • Good boot space
  • Highly rated infotainment system
Cons
  • Looks may be divisive

Exterior

The C4 rides higher than the old C4 Cactus, coming in at 4360mm long, 1800mm wide and 1525mm high. In keeping with the rest of the Citroen family, super-slim daytime running lights are situated high in the nose, while the beefed-up wheelarches and elongated roofline combine to give it a profile more akin to a coupé than a crossover. The slightly angled tailgate, miniscule rear spoiler and proportionately large bumper that sits out behind the car further enhances this impression. 

Interior

Inside the C4 is chock-full of matt-black surfaces while prospective buyers get a choice of matt chrome or high-gloss black inserts on the air vents, centre console, dashboard and steering wheel. The frameless digital display looks straightforward enough and tailored towards the driver, as does the 10.0in touchscreen for the infotainment system. Much taller than a conventional hatchback, the C4 will have a higher driving position than you may expect and excellent ground clearance. Citroën’s signature flat-bottomed steering wheel is still there as are lots of clever storage solutions. The boot has 380 litres of space along with a low load lip and adjustable floor. 

Performance

The ë-C4 is powered by the 134bhp electric motor and 50kWh battery that has already been used in the Peugeot e-2008 and it comes with an official range of 217 miles. The battery can be replenished using a 100kW rapid charger, achieving an 80% charge in 30 minutes. 0 – 100 kilometres per hour will take 9.7 seconds

Reliability

Citroens highly-regarded 5 year warranty comes as standard and the French car giant's dealer network is continually expanding. 

Running Costs

There are three petrol engines available including Citroen’s PureTech 1.2-litre three-cylinder engine (100PS, 130PS and 155PS), with the more powerful versions offered with an eight-speed automatic gearbox. The sole diesel version so far is a 102PS 1.5-litre option which comes with either a six-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic. There will be also going to be an electric version, badged the e-C4. The C4 and e-C4 are due to go on sale in the autumn, with deliveries arriving before the end of 2020. Exact Irish specifications and pricing have yet to be confirmed, but the C4 is likely to start from around 25,000 euro. 

Handling

Featuring the Progressive Hydraulic Cushion suspension that we’ve already seen on the C4 Cactus and C5 Aircross, the new C4 should be able to soak up the imperfections on Irish roads easily. A lot of attention has also been paid to seat comfort, with well-padded cushions, lumbar support for the front seats and centre armrests front and rear to make occupants feel like they’re sitting in armchairs. 

Safety

This Citroen has yet to be given an NCAP safety rating but it is sure to be highly rated as it comes with an extensive list of all the latest safety equipment and features as standard. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

Citroën has a proud past as a manufacturer of cars that fall into the French tradition of being charming and comfortable. From the unforgettable DS of the 1960’s to the C4 Cactus of the 21st century, the French car giant has often left us guessing as to their next move. Judging by what we have seen so far, the latest edition of the Citroen C4 promises to continue this trend as it replaces the quirky Cactus. While it will lean towards a crossover SUV, it takes many of its styling cues from the C5 Aircross. Citroën has informed us that the main emphasis of the C4 will be on comfort and each model will come equipped with Advanced Comfort seats - including optional heating and massaging systems - and Progressive Hydraulic Cushion suspension, which utilises two hydraulic stops to smooth out bumps in the road.