2021 Mazda MX-30 Review

5/5

Overview

The MX-30 is Mazda’s first production EV. The name might be confusing to some as MX is usually the sign that it is a coupe or roadster, rather than an EV. This is most definitely an electric vehicle, with Mazda claiming 124 miles on the WLTP cycle. Mazda have done the sums and figured out that their target market does not need any more distance from a full charge. They also revealed that the battery comes in just one size – the 35.5kWh one the MX-30 was launched with. Longer range figures will be attained by the addition of a ‘rotary range-extender unit’. It is a five-seater car and the hipster will be happy knowing that it has trim made from cork and its plastics are made from recycled PET bottles.

Pros
  • Extensive list of standard equipment
  • Corking interior design ;)
  • Typical Mazda pedigree and reliability
  • Comprehensive list of safety equipment
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • Styling may be divisive

Exterior

If you have difficulty telling one EV from another then you will be impressed by Mazda’s different approach to design. There are some new lines and curves so that you can easily differentiate it from others in its class. The ‘freestyle door’ design invokes memories of the classic RX-8 coupe of yore and an immediate talking point whenever somebody stops to have a look at your MX-30. The 18-inch alloy wheels and LED running lights that come as standard across the range spruce things up even further. 

Interior

Hipsters will rejoice at the vegan materials and cork-covered cupholders dotted around the MX-30’s cabin. Forgive me if I sound skeptical, Mazda’s green credentials are actually based on sound logic as they started out making cork over 100 years ago. That said, it is still a very user-friendly cabin with everything just within reach of the driver. While the interior is innovative in places, Mazda have kept most things refreshingly simple. The gear selector physically clicks between Park, Reverse, Neutral and Drive. There is also a refreshingly simple analogue fuel level gauge that tells you how much battery is remaining and plenty of physical buttons around the dash. The boot space is a reasonable 366-litres which is about the same as what you expect from an equivalent Ford Focus. While there is a decent amount of space on board, it will be worth having a proper look at one before you commit to having more than two children there on long journeys. 

Performance

The MX-30’s drive is as sprightly as you could expect to hope for from a 1.6-tonne SUV. It is decent to drive, has a tidy, taut turning circle and you can even get a little bit of wheelspin out of a corner if you’re brisk with it. It’s no sports coupe, but in the sensible world of EV motoring, it is one of the more inspiring offerings out there. 

Reliability

Mazda’s recent reliability record is second-to-none and all models come with a three year, 100,000 kilometer warranty. 

Running Costs

Mazda have a specially tailored app to assist you in keeping tabs on the battery level etc. A 20 to 80 percent charge takes just over half an hour with DC charging or three hours using traditional AC. When you consider the cheap tax bracket that it falls into along with the minimal everyday running costs, prospective MX-30 owners stand to save a pretty penny.

Handling

The smaller than usual steering wheel and quick gear ratio combine to make the MX30 feel reasonably light and agile in city junctions while remaining steady on the open road. 

Safety

The MX-30 comes with a range of standard safety equipment that includes vehicle, pedestrian and cyclist detection, lane centering, radar cruise, road-edge sensing and LED headlamps plus no less than are 10 airbags. Nothing less than you would expect from a Mazda. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

The MX-30 is Mazda’s first production EV. The name might be confusing to some as MX is usually the sign that it is a coupe or roadster, rather than an EV. This is most definitely an electric vehicle, with Mazda claiming 124 miles on the WLTP cycle. Mazda have done the sums and figured out that their target market does not need any more distance from a full charge. They also revealed that the battery comes in just one size – the 35.5kWh one the MX-30 was launched with. Longer range figures will be attained by the addition of a ‘rotary range-extender unit’. It is a five-seater car and the hipster will be happy knowing that it has trim made from cork and its plastics are made from recycled PET bottles.