2021 Skoda Kamiq Review

5/5

Overview

The Kamiq is smaller and cheaper than the Kodiaq and Karoq and completes Skoda’s triumvirate of SUVs.  The Kamiq shares much of its mechanical underpinnings with the Volkswagen T-Cross and SEAT Arona. All versions of the Kamiq are front-wheel-drive and the spec levels are relatively straightforward: basic ‘S’ trim gets things started, then there is ‘SE’ and ‘SE L’ levels. Skoda predicts that the mid-range 1.0 litre SE manual will be the most popular with Irish buyers so if you are in the market for a reliable family car at a reasonable price then continue reading….

Pros
  • Extensive list of standard equipment
  • Great interior design
  • Typical Skoda pedigree and reliability
  • Comprehensive list of safety equipment
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • Styling may be divisive

Exterior

This is Skoda’s first car with scrolling LED indicators and that is about as daring as they got with this design. It was clearly a car that was designed with a strong emphasis on practicality, making it a very easy car to live with on a daily basis. While there is just one body style to choose from it is still one that is stylish, spacious and well-equipped. While rivals such as the T-Cross, Aircross and Captur are all about groovy styling, Skoda have let the Kamiq get on with business in an understated but nonetheless stylish fashion. The neat two-piece headlights and large Skoda lettering on the rear end is all extremely classy, making the Kamiq stand out but with the minimum of fuss.

Interior

The Kamiq’s utilitarian and simple cabin will find favour with those already familiar with the typical robust offerings from the VW group. Skoda claim that the Kamiq is the roomiest car in its class and there is certainly enough room for three adults across the back, despite the ‘coupe’ like sloping roofline. There is also 400 litres of space in the boot which can be easily expanded by folding the split rear seats. The digital dials offer a range of different layouts while the touchscreen infotainment system is logical, easy to read and quickly negotiated. We were grateful to learn that Skoda have decided to retain physical knobs and buttons for the climate control, useful when you need to change temperature quickly in a stuffy cabin. 

Performance

The standard chassis with standard wheels is a comfortable combination with minimal body roll and well-judged steering. The 1.0 litre 113bhp engine is well regarded having been tested in the Audi A1 and Skoda Scala and has a decent amount of power with few revs. 

Reliability

Skoda’s recent reliability record is second-to-none and all models come with a three year, 100,000 kilometer warranty with the first two years unlimited mileage and the third year 150,000 kms. The Czech car-makers always compare favourably to their rivals in customer satisfaction surveys and have a loyal fanbase. 

Running Costs

The 1.6 TDI is sure to be a popular engine variant among Irish buyers and it returned upwards of 45 miles per gallon in recent tests as opposed to 35 miles per gallon for the petrol version. All cars get LED running lights, alloy wheels and DAB radio, but to add Apple and Android mirroring you’ll need an SE, while top-grade SEL models will get the touchscreen and main dial cluster.

Handling

The sports chassis (tightens up the suspension) is one option you can afford to do without as some reviewers have noted that it makes the car ‘figety’ on the motorway. The standard chassis with standard wheels is a comfortable combination with minimal body roll and well-judged steering.

Safety

The Kamiq comes with a range of standard safety equipment. The bodyshell is almost totally comprised of high-strength steel and among the safety features include Lane Assist, Front Assist with City Emergency Brake and Predictive Pedestrian Protection, plus Multi-Collision Brake.

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

The Kamiq is smaller and cheaper than the Kodiaq and Karoq and completes Skoda’s triumvirate of SUVs.  The Kamiq shares much of its mechanical underpinnings with the Volkswagen T-Cross and SEAT Arona. All versions of the Kamiq are front-wheel-drive and the spec levels are relatively straightforward: basic ‘S’ trim gets things started, then there is ‘SE’ and ‘SE L’ levels. Skoda predicts that the mid-range 1.0 litre SE manual will be the most popular with Irish buyers so if you are in the market for a reliable family car at a reasonable price then continue reading….