2021 Volkswagen Tiguan Review

5/5

Overview

The second generation Tiguan has a lot to live up to. Its predecessor has been extremely popular, outselling many of its rivals on the way to becoming the third biggest selling VW after the Golf and Polo. VW have sought to make the Tiguan more upmarket so as well as a standard five-seat Tiguan there is also a seven-seat AllSpace option available. All Wheel Drive is available on most power outputs, increasing the ride height by 11mm. There is a variety of engines ranging from 113 to 237bhp, the latter of which will be provided by a highly-rated twin-turbo diesel. 

Pros
  • Typical VW pedigree and dealership network
  • Ergonomic interior design
  • Comprehensive list of safety equipment
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • Safe styling

Exterior

Exterior design is based on evolution rather than revolution. It is a sharp looking car with clean lines and a premium image. We recommend speccing it in R-Line trim which makes it a really impressive proposition, giving the likes of the Volvo XC40, Audi Q3 and BMW X1 a run for their money, but even in standard guise it looks the part.

Interior

The interior is typical VW in that it is ergonomically excellent, well screwed together and extremely functional. The ‘Virtual Cockpit’ dials are the same ones you will find in the Audi TT and are a nice option. Any smartphone can link up with the infotainment system easily while you can also have a dash of colour if you want. The AllSpace costs about three grand more than the standard Tiguan and for that you get an extra 100 litres of space in the boot as well as two seats which fold into the boot floor. 

Performance

Most Irish buyers will plump for the popular 2.0 TDI diesel and it is easy to see why as it is refined most of the time while still being capable of giving you a bit of oomph when you need it. The Tiguan weighs in at 1,673kg which isn’t earth shattering by todays standards and does lend itself to an effortless power uptake with the DSG gearbox.

Reliability

Volkswagen’s recent reliability record is excellent and all models come with a three year warranty with unlimited mileage for the first two years and a 90,000km limit on the third year.

Running Costs

The Tiguan is considered the premium car of its class and as a consequence you can expect to pay a little more than its rivals for the pleasure of owning one. However, this is offset by the fact that it should hold its value better than most. Again, we recommend paying the extra for the R-Line if you can afford it as it really enhances the look of the car. The 148bhp diesel engine is sure to be popular with Irish buyers and VW claim it will return up 50.4 miles per gallon. 

Handling

It is a tight and grippy car to drive which is not wholly surprising as it shares the same automotive architecture as the likes of the Golf and Audi A3. It is also no surprise to learn that the handling is positively car-like in its application, although those of you with a Tiguan in R-Line guise can expect a slightly firmer ride. 

Safety

The Tiguan comes with a wide range of standard safety equipment and was awarded a five-star Euro NCAP safety rating. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

The second generation Tiguan has a lot to live up to. Its predecessor has been extremely popular, outselling many of its rivals on the way to becoming the third biggest selling VW after the Golf and Polo. VW have sought to make the Tiguan more upmarket so as well as a standard five-seat Tiguan there is also a seven-seat AllSpace option available. All Wheel Drive is available on most power outputs, increasing the ride height by 11mm. There is a variety of engines ranging from 113 to 237bhp, the latter of which will be provided by a highly-rated twin-turbo diesel.