2021 Jaguar XF Review

5/5

Overview

The words ‘executive saloon’ might sound like a shaded relic of the 1990s but with the XF Jaguar aim to contradict those assertions as the new head honcho Thierry Bollore attempts to point them in the direction of an electric future. The XF has performed admirably in recent road tests with testers paying particular attention to the handling and ride balance. There are now just three engines to choose from – a 201bhp 2.0 litre four-cylinder diesel with a 48V mild-hybrid and a 2.0 litre petrol in 247bhp and 296bhp guises. It is priced significantly less than its rivals as well as the previous model, something Jaguar says is part of a revised commercial strategy. 

Pros
  • Typical Jaguar reliability and pedigree
  • Ergonomic interior design
  • Comprehensive list of safety equipment
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • Safe interior styling

Exterior

The exterior makeover is a case of evolution rather than revolution, but it scores well in all the right places. The front is a bit edgier with a more aero-dynamic bumper, larger air intakes and more streamlined LED headlights that have a ‘double J’ design. You will find the Jaguar logo on the side vents and etched within the headlights. When you get to the back you will find an enlarged diffuser and new bumper which again emphasizes its stance. We recommend speccing it in the ultra-desirable R-dynamic guise if you can. 

Interior

Jaguar's new ‘electronic vehicle architecture’ arrives in the XF with the Pivi Pro dual sim infotainment system and software-over-the-air technology. This technology has two major trump cards – it is fast and easy to use. It is also aesthetically pleasing with the 11.4inch curved glass touchscreen fitted with a dual coating for anti-glare and to make it easier to wipe away fingerprints. Jaguar tells us that the dual sims and two LTE models enable it to perform multiple functions simultaneously. You will also get cloud connectivity, online routing and live traffic updates. You will be glad to hear that climate control is still operated by wonderfully old-school rotary controllers while aluminum and open pore wood trim are plush options. 

Performance

The XF is an impressively sophisticated car to drive. Its aluminum-intensive chassis is rigid, suspended on double wishbones at the front and a multi-link at the rear. The 2.0 litre ‘Ingenium’ four-cylinder engine makes 296bhp at 5,500 rpm. The XF P300 will get to 100 kilometres per hour in 5.8 seconds. 

Reliability

Jaguar’s recent reliability record is very good and all new Jaguar models come with a three year / 100,000 kilometre warranty.

Running Costs

Jaguar has introduced mild-hybrid technology for its 2.0 litre diesel engine which certainly improves matters although plug-in-hybrid options from BMW or Mercedes will offer superior economy. The rear-wheel-drive XF D200 manages a respectable 57.2 miles per gallon while emitting 130g/km while the four-wheel-drive version emits 193g/km and offers 32.9 miles per gallon. 

Handling

The combination of the XF’s perfectly tuned electric power steering and the subtle way in which it soaks up surface bumps and crevasses makes for an enjoyable, relaxing drive. Standard all-wheel-drive makes sure it is grippy even on moist roads. The overall feeling is one of confidence rather than anything too exhilarating.

Safety

The Jaguar XF comes with a wide range of standard safety equipment and was awarded a five-star Euro NCAP safety rating. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

The words ‘executive saloon’ might sound like a shaded relic of the 1990s but with the XF Jaguar aim to contradict those assertions as the new head honcho Thierry Bollore attempts to point them in the direction of an electric future. The XF has performed admirably in recent road tests with testers paying particular attention to the handling and ride balance. There are now just three engines to choose from – a 201bhp 2.0 litre four-cylinder diesel with a 48V mild-hybrid and a 2.0 litre petrol in 247bhp and 296bhp guises. It is priced significantly less than its rivals as well as the previous model, something Jaguar says is part of a revised commercial strategy.