2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Quatrifoglio Review

5/5

Overview

The Stelvio is based on the same platform as the Alfa Romeo Giulia saloon, it sits 20cm higher, and Alfa’s Q4 all-wheel-drive system is standard on all but one of the Stelvio’s five engine options.This is very much an SUV designed to tackle roads. Alfa’s engineering chief, Roberto Fedeli, (formerly of Ferrari) told us his aim was to exactly reproduce the Giulia in the way the Stelvio drives – a candid admission that modern customers like the idea of an SUV, but don’t want the roly-poly dynamics its higher centre of gravity brings with it. The mighty 510bhp 2.9-litre V6 of the Quadrifoglio performance model is linked up to an eight-speed automatic gearbox as standard, with lovely long metal paddleshifters if you’ve ticked the option box. 

Pros
  • Typical Alfa performance and pedigree
  • Ergonomic interior design
  • Excellent driving dynamics
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • Interior perhaps not as robust as it could be

Exterior

The flamboyant styling was recognizable from the Giulia. You’d be very hard pushed to work out the difference between the 2019 Stelvio and the 2021 Stelvio, and the same is the case with the Quadrifoglio. But that’s not a particularly bad thing. In a world of really mixed results from manufacturers trying to make their SUVs look interesting, the Stelvio always stood out as a stunner. There was no real point in messing with that for what is pretty much a facelift. There’s some new black detailing around the iconic Alfa triangular grille and a few other places, where once there was chrome, but for all that matters it’s the same.

Interior

The inside of the Stelvio is a very comfortable place to be, with a mature, sensitive ride on long distances, even with the Quadrifoglio badge on board. It is practical too with a large 525-litre boot complete with a low load lip. There is also a surprisingly decent amount of rear head and legroom, making this a really good all-rounder. Some tasty options include heated rear seats, a huge glass sunroof and abundant USB charging ports. You can operate the infotainment system via touchscreen or physical dial while the display is both windscreen and high definition. 

Performance

The simple beauty of the first Stelvio Quadrifoglio was that it drove and handled very much like a hot hatch. You will be glad to learn that the new car has lost none of that appeal. It is powered by the same Ferrari-derived V6 2.9 litre twin-turbocharged unit that can push the Stelvio towards 100 kmph in just 3.8 seconds with a max limit of 178 miles per hour, not bad for a car that weighs 1.8 tonnes. In fact, it is just 0.2s slower than a Lamborghini Urus while costing considerably less and looking considerably better.

Reliability

Alfa Romeo’s recent reliability record has been improving and all new Alfa models come with a 24 month new car warranty and an additional third year limited to 100,000 kilometres.

Running Costs

If you are reading this then maybe the Quadrifoglio badge is not for you. Having said that the aerodynamics succeed in making this supercar as fuel efficient as you could possibly expect from such a machine. 

Handling

The Stelvio has been compared to the Giulia in this area which is no bad thing. It drives very neatly for an SUV, just make sure you take it on a thorough test-drive to make sure you are okay with the quick-geared steering. The Quadrifoglio is truly one of the great performance SUVs. 

Safety

The 2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio comes with a wide range of standard safety equipment and was awarded a five-star Euro NCAP safety rating. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
90%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
70%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

The Stelvio is based on the same platform as the Alfa Romeo Giulia saloon, it sits 20cm higher, and Alfa’s Q4 all-wheel-drive system is standard on all but one of the Stelvio’s five engine options.This is very much an SUV designed to tackle roads. Alfa’s engineering chief, Roberto Fedeli, (formerly of Ferrari) told us his aim was to exactly reproduce the Giulia in the way the Stelvio drives – a candid admission that modern customers like the idea of an SUV, but don’t want the roly-poly dynamics its higher centre of gravity brings with it. The mighty 510bhp 2.9-litre V6 of the Quadrifoglio performance model is linked up to an eight-speed automatic gearbox as standard, with lovely long metal paddleshifters if you’ve ticked the option box.