2021 Hyundai Bayon Review

5/5

Overview

The Hyundai Bayon might not be the most spacious small SUV in its class, but it delivers a comprehensive package, offering a comfortable ride and an electrified drivetrain that delivers both performance and efficiency. All this makes it a sure contender in the congested compact crossover class. While Hyundai has its Kona compact crossover, they felt that there was still room in the line-up below this for an even smaller model and so we get the i20-based Bayon. Built to rival the Fiesta-based Puma, the cars fruity styling gives it undoubted presence.  The entry point to the line-up is a 99bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol turbo, as with the i20 range, while there is also the more powerful 118bhp 1.0-litre unit. Both feature 48-volt mild-hybrid technology to improve efficiency.

Pros
  • Typical Hyundai practicality and refinement
  • Ergonomic interior design
  • Excellent driving dynamics
  • Easy-to-use infotainment system
Cons
  • May depreciate in time

Exterior

The new model gets slim, narrow, high-mounted LED daytime-running lights and large grille that is quickly becoming a trademark of Hyundai SUV’s. It comes with lots of body creases, along with a maximum ride height of 183mm, skidplate and black lower-body cladding that all combine to give this car a real muscular image and presence on the road. 

Interior

You have a choice of black or two-tone grey cloth upholstery with a 10.25-inch digital instrument panel as standard. Nice optional extras include LED ambient lighting for the footwells, storage cubbies and door-handle surrounds, a Bose sound system, wireless device charging and wireless smartphone mirroring.  At 4180mm long, 1775mm wide, and 1490mm tall (or 1500mm with 17-inch wheels), its dimensions strike a balance between compactness and convenience. Front-seat passengers will get 1072mm of legroom, while the rear seats offer 882mm, and the 411-litre boot can be extended to 1205 litres with the split rear bench folded flat 

Performance

The most powerful engine available is mated to a very clever six-speed intelligent manual transmission that utilizes modern technology to help reduce fuel consumption.  The engine pulls smoothly, with a decent spread of torque and enough performance for a small SUV, completing the 0-62mph sprint in 10.4 seconds. You’d never know the clutch pedal wasn’t physically linked to the gearbox as it’s still easy to pull away and the engine cuts back in smoothly. 

Reliability

Hyundai’s recent reliability record is as good as you would expect and all new Hyundai’s come with a five year / unlimited mileage warranty.

Running Costs

You have the choice of three different specifications: SE Connect, Premium and Ultimate. The cheapest model is the SE Connect 1.0 T-GDI (99bhp) with a six-speed iMT intelligent manual. It comes with 16-inch alloy wheels, roof rails, electric mirrors, LED daytime and running lamps. The Bayon Premium, with the same 1.0 T-GDI petrol engine, but for small extra cost you get larger 17-inch alloy wheels, privacy glass, heated front seats and steering wheel, climate control in place of air conditioning, wireless phone charging, LED front and rear lamps, electric folding mirrors and a larger 10.25-inch touchscreen that includes navigation. Upgrade to the range-topping Bayon Ultimate 1.0 T-GDI and you get black gloss door mirrors, a two-tone black and grey interior, keyless go, a premium sound system, blind spot warning, and lane-keep assist.

Handling

The little Bayon takes corners with relative ease. There is minimal body roll and it feels nice and grippy even in wet conditions.

Safety

The 2021 Hyundai Bayon comes with a wide range of standard safety equipment and we expect it to rate highly on Euro NCAP safety rating. 

Summary

Exterior
80%
Interior
80%
Performance
80%
Reliability
90%
Running Costs
90%
Handling
90%
Safety
100%

The Hyundai Bayon might not be the most spacious small SUV in its class, but it delivers a comprehensive package, offering a comfortable ride and an electrified drivetrain that delivers both performance and efficiency. All this makes it a sure contender in the congested compact crossover class. While Hyundai has its Kona compact crossover, they felt that there was still room in the line-up below this for an even smaller model and so we get the i20-based Bayon. Built to rival the Fiesta-based Puma, the cars fruity styling gives it undoubted presence.  The entry point to the line-up is a 99bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol turbo, as with the i20 range, while there is also the more powerful 118bhp 1.0-litre unit. Both feature 48-volt mild-hybrid technology to improve efficiency.